Man trying on glasses

Low Vision Awareness Month: Causes, Symptoms, and Management for Low Vision

Every February, Low Vision Awareness Month shines a spotlight on a crucial aspect of eye health that often goes unrecognized. Low vision, a condition affecting millions worldwide, is not just a matter of poor eyesight that can be corrected with standard glasses or contact lenses. Instead, it represents a range of visual impairments that significantly impact daily life but cannot be fully corrected by prescription lenses.

At Clarkson Eyecare, we understand that knowledge is the first step towards empowerment. This is why, during Low Vision Awareness Month, we are committed to not only raising awareness about this condition but also providing valuable insights into its causes, symptoms, and available management strategies. Join us in exploring these critical aspects of low vision as we aim to bring clarity and hope to those affected and emphasize the importance of regular eye care for everyone.

Understanding Low Vision

Low vision is a significant visual impairment that standard eyeglasses, contact lenses, medications, or surgery cannot fully correct. It encompasses a spectrum of visual impairments, ranging from mild loss to near-total blindness. The implications of low vision extend beyond the direct impairment of sight. It can significantly affect daily activities, leading to challenges in performing routine tasks. The condition can also contribute to social isolation and emotional stress. 

According to the CDC, the number of adults with vision impairment and age-related eye diseases is projected to double in the next three decades due to an aging population and the rise in chronic diseases such as diabetes. Because of this rising trend, recognizing the symptoms of low vision is essential for early intervention and effective management. Common signs include:

  • Difficulty with near or distance vision

  • Challenges in low light or nighttime conditions

  • Blurry or hazy vision

  • Frequent fluctuations in visual clarity

  • Trouble distinguishing colors or contrasts

Causes of Low Vision

Low vision is a result of a variety of eye diseases and conditions. Understanding these causes is crucial for both prevention and management. Here we explore some of the most common causes of low vision:

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a prominent cause of low vision, particularly in individuals over 50 years of age. AMD primarily affects the macula, the central part of the retina responsible for detailed vision used in activities like reading and driving. 

The disease progresses in two forms: dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular). The dry form, which is more common, involves the gradual thinning of the macula, leading to a slow loss of central vision. The wet form, although less common, is more severe and can cause rapid vision loss due to abnormal blood vessel growth under the retina, leading to bleeding and scarring.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that cause damage to the optic nerve, an essential component of vision. This damage is typically the result of abnormally high intraocular pressure. Over time, the increased pressure can erode the optic nerve tissue, leading to vision loss. 

Glaucoma is a particularly difficult condition to treat, as it often progresses without any early symptoms. By the time the vision loss is noticeable, significant damage has already occurred. Regular screening for eye pressure is essential for early detection and vision loss prevention.

Diabetic Retinopathy

A complication of diabetes that affects the eyes, diabetic retinopathy is caused by damage to the blood vessels in the retina. In the early stages, these blood vessels may leak fluid or bleed, leading to vision distortion. As the condition progresses, it can cause the growth of new, abnormal blood vessels on the retina that further impair vision. Diabetic retinopathy can lead to significant vision loss or blindness, making it critical for individuals with diabetes to manage their blood sugar levels and have regular eye examinations.

Cataracts

Cataracts, common in older adults, is a clouding of the eye's natural lens. This clouding develops gradually, initially causing mild vision problems like blurring, glare, and reduced color intensity. As the cataract develops, it can significantly impair vision, making activities like reading and driving difficult. 

While the exact cause of cataract development is not always clear, factors like aging, ultraviolet radiation, and certain diseases like diabetes contribute to its progression. Cataracts are one of the most treatable causes of low vision, with surgery effectively restoring vision in most cases.

Other Causes of Low Vision

There are several additional causes of low vision, including eye injuries, genetic disorders like retinitis pigmentosa, and congenital disabilities. These conditions can vary widely in their impact on vision. For instance, eye injuries can lead to immediate vision loss or progressive deterioration over time. Genetic and congenital conditions often result in a gradual loss of vision, affecting individuals differently based on the specific disorder. Additionally, certain medications and prolonged exposure to sunlight without proper eye protection can also contribute to low vision.

Management Strategies for Low Vision

Managing low vision involves a combination of medical treatments, vision rehabilitation, assistive technologies, and lifestyle adjustments. The goal is to maximize the remaining vision and help individuals adapt to their vision loss to maintain their independence and quality of life. 

Everyone's experience with low vision is unique, and management strategies should be tailored to your specific needs and lifestyle. Regular consultations with eye care professionals and low vision specialists are essential in developing an effective management plan.

Medical Treatments

Medical treatments play a crucial role in managing certain underlying causes of low vision. For example, anti-VEGF injections are a common treatment for wet AMD, helping to slow vision loss and, in some cases, improve sight. Glaucoma, another major cause of low vision, can often be managed with medications, laser therapy, or surgery to lower eye pressure and prevent further optic nerve damage. 

In cases of diabetic retinopathy, controlling blood sugar levels is essential, and laser treatments or surgery may be required to prevent further damage to the retina. Regular consultations with eye care professionals are vital to monitor your eye health and determine the most effective treatment options.

Vision Rehabilitation

Vision rehabilitation is integral to managing low vision, including training and resources to help maximize your remaining vision and adapt to vision loss. As a part of your vision rehabilitation, you may learn new ways to perform daily tasks, and the emotional impacts of vision loss are addressed through adaptive devices, orientation and mobility training, and counseling.

These services are provided by professionals such as low vision therapists, occupational therapists, and orientation and mobility specialists, who work collaboratively to develop a personalized rehabilitation plan. This Low Vision Awareness Month, spread the word about vision rehabilitation therapy to help those struggling with low vision maintain their quality of life and their mental health.

Assistive Technologies

Assistive technologies and adaptive devices are key to enhancing independence and quality of life for individuals with low vision. These technologies range from simple magnifying glasses and specialized lighting to high-tech digital magnifiers and text-to-speech software. 

The advancement of technology has also led to innovative solutions like smartphone apps designed specifically for low vision users, offering features like voice commands and screen readers. These tools can significantly aid in reading, navigating, and performing other everyday activities.

Lifestyle Adjustments

Modifying your home environment can greatly improve safety and functionality. This might involve enhancing lighting, using high-contrast colors for better visibility, and organizing your living space to make it easier to navigate.

Social support also plays a crucial role in adjusting to low vision. Support groups, whether online or in person, offer a platform to share experiences, gain emotional support, and learn practical tips from others who face similar challenges.

The Importance of Regular Eye Exams

Think of regular eye exams as your eye check-up. Just like you visit your doctor to keep tabs on your health, your eyes need the same kind of attention. Here's why these check-ups are so important:

  1. Early Detection: Some eye diseases and conditions, like glaucoma, can sneak up on you without any warning signs. Regular eye exams help catch these issues early, making them easier to treat and manage.

  2. Monitoring Changes in Vision: Our eyes change naturally as we age. Regular check-ups ensure you’re always seeing as clearly as possible, whether that means updating your prescription or getting advice on managing age-related vision changes.

  3. Identifying Systematic Health Issues: Eye exams can sometimes reveal other health issues, like diabetes or high blood pressure. Your eyes are a window to your overall health, and consistently visiting the eye doctor can help you identify problems before they worsen.

  4. Adjusting Low Vision Aids: If you already use glasses or other aids, regular exams ensure they continue to effectively correct your vision as your eyes and vision evolve.

Observe Low Vision Awareness Month with an Eye Exam

Low Vision Awareness Month is not just a time to acknowledge the challenges faced by those with low vision but also an opportunity to highlight the importance of eye health in our overall well-being. The main takeaway? Regular eye exams are crucial. They're the first line of defense in detecting and managing eye conditions that could lead to low vision.

 

For those already experiencing low vision, know that there are numerous strategies and resources available to help maintain independence and quality of life. From medical treatments to assistive technologies and lifestyle adjustments, the goal is to maximize the use of remaining vision and continue to engage in daily activities.

At Clarkson Eyecare, our low vision specialists are committed to providing comprehensive eye care and supporting our patients every step of the way. Whether it's through preventive care, treatment, or management of low vision, our team is dedicated to ensuring that everyone has access to the best possible eye care.

 

If you're experiencing symptoms of low vision, don't hesitate to reach out to our experts. Schedule an appointment with Clarkson Eyecare to find the best management strategies for your unique vision needs.

Elk River 
Elk River 
Centerville
79 Crossing
Virginia Beach
Alliance
Centralia
Independence Plaza
Westerville
South Columbus
Maryland Heights
Overland
Mason and Manchester
Nine Mile
Northfield
Fern Creek
Tecumseh
Shea Boulevard
West Chester Tylersville
Highland
The Spec Shoppe: St. Joseph
Paducah
Affton
Creve Coeur
Chanhassen
Edwardsville Club Center
West Park
Middleburg Heights
Blue Ash
Mariemont
Union
Washington
Farmington
Alpharetta
Belleville
Perryville
Willoughby
Manchester
Wesley Chapel
Bricktown
Austell (EW Connector)
Sharpsburg
Downtown St. Louis
Southeast Novi
Vinings
Clifton
Okemos
West Camino Del Sol
Navarre
Springhurst
Dearborn Heights
Fairfield
Medina
Perry
Marysville
Warrenton
Town Street
Town & Country Crossing
Florissant Dunn Rd.
Bexley
Ballwin
Alton
Pavilion Crossing
Haslett
Granite City Nameoki
New Albany
Columbia Broadway
Wentzville
Chesterfield
Shakopee
Stonebrook
Woodlands
Legacy
Keller
Countryside
Tampa (Busch)
Brunswick
Shiloh
Maplewood
Trinity
Three Rivers
Shepherdsville
Bogey Hills
Ann Arbor on Main
Worthington
Ann Arbor Children's Clinic for Vision Enhancement
Elizabethtown
Woodbine
Lake St. Louis
West Broad St.
Hilliard
Pontiac
Howell Township
Ann Arbor Plymouth
Coventry
Mansfield
Grand River
Matawan
Pleasant Hill
Imperial
Edwardsville Crossing
Clarksville
Conyers
Lilburn
Anderson
Delta Township
Saline
Suwanee
West Chester Union Centre
Lake Ridge
Hazlet Plaza
Red Bank
Columbia Rock Bridge Red Oak
Jennings
Lakeland
Lebanon
Wildwood
Pacific
Butler Hill
Arnold Park Mall
Valrico
Calvert City
Berryhill
Snellville
Braselton
Ft. Mitchell
Lone Oak
Perdido
Davis Highway
Kenwood
Harrison
Lutz Sunlake Centre
Plant City North
Gulf Breeze
Tesson Ferry
Telegraph Plaza
South County
St. Louis Hills
Central West End
South Grand
Milford
Loveland
Kettering
Dublin
Reynoldsburg
Riverview
Downtown Columbus
Riverview Vision Performance Center
Eureka
O'Fallon South
94 Crossing
Arnold
Franconia
Valley Station
141 & Olive
Chesterfield Valley
Collinsville
Columbia
Middletown
Festus
Beacon Center (Alexandria)
Fenton
Breese
Cold Spring
Lake Lansing Rd.
Western Hills
Florissant HWY 67
Kirkwood
North Lebanon
Benton
O'Fallon North
Mid Rivers
Bardstown
Sea Girt Mall
Eatontown
Wooster
Delaware
Kissimmee
Towncenter Plaza (Sterling)
Manassas
Fredericksburg
Green
Mt. Orab
Morrow
Gahanna
Webster Groves
Troy
Rock Hill
Clayton
High Ridge
Ellisville
Brentwood Pointe
Oxboro
Murray
Mayfield
Waterloo
Swansea
Mt. Vernon
Godfrey
Fairview Heights
Miramar
Fort Walton